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28
May

EFCC and Emeka Ugwuonye:How The Internet Saved The Day

Written by Ephraim Emeka Ugwuonye, Esq .

The story of my recent experience in Nigeria would never be complete without mentioning in the first paragraph the role of the Internet (the new media). It saved. In the past, the Nigerian government officials had been able to eliminate their opponents, not necessarily by killing them as you may think, but rather often by controlling the narrative. It is incredible how far they would go to control the story, to misinform, disinform, and manipulate what people believe. In my case, the storyline they peddled was how I took their money without authorization.

Even though this is an old story that lost credibility as time went on, they tried to make it believable by distorting it as much as they could. They claimed they still don’t know how much money was realized for Nigeria from the property transactions. They were silent on the 20 million dollars that each Ambassador and the each Foreign Affair Minister have been fighting over. They never said a word about Nigerian government property in San Francisco. They never told you that I have had an active retainer on the matter and that I am still their attorney on that matter.

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28
May

Echoes:Nigeria, Norway and the Lessons of Oil

Written by John Campbell.

John CampbellWhen I was serving in Nigeria as U.S. ambassador, I once asked a Norwegian diplomat a seemingly simple question: Who became rich from oil in his country? He replied, "Nobody and everybody."

He then described how Norwegians use oil revenue to lift all boats over the long term. I asked him where rich Norwegians actually made their money. He replied, "Oh, shipping, banking and timber -- you know, the modern economy." Add a comment

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26
May

Nigeria: The way forward

Written by Vincent Ogboi.

Vincent OgboiNow that Nigeria has completed what is perceived by many as a relatively free and fair election, even though the elections cannot be termed as uneventful or completely free or short of its usual short-comings such as elections fraud, religious riots, as is common with many elections, it can still be judged a success by most standards.

It appears that Nigeria’s Independent electoral Commission and the electorate are determined more than ever to continue on this trajectory of free and fair elections that is needed to entrench their democracy which although still in its infancy can now begin to mature. Add a comment

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